First Trimester: Week 3

first trimester
first trimester

A peek inside your womb — Implantation

fetal-development-week-3

Amniotic sac: Amniotic fluid is beginning to collect in this cavity, which will soon envelop the embryo and become the anmniotic sac.

Blastocyst: Your baby-in-the-making is a tiny ball of several hundred rapidly multiplying cells. The ball is called a blastocyst.

Embryo: The cells that will become the embryo are beginning to arrange themselves in two round and flat layers.

Placental cells: These cells will soon form the placenta. Right now they’re producing hCG, the hormone that turns a pregnancy test positive.

Uterine lining: The blastocyst has started burrowing into the blood-rich uterine lining.

Vagina: You may notice a bit of spotting by the end of this week, possibly caused by the blastocyst burrowing into the blood-rich uterine lining.

Yolk sac: This cavity will soon be the yolk sac, which produces your baby’s red blood cells and delivers nutrients until the placenta is ready to take over.

 

How your baby’s growing

See how your baby is developing
See how your baby is developing
The eggg is now a "blastocyst" burrowing into the blood-rich uterine lining
The eggg is now a “blastocyst” burrowing into the blood-rich uterine lining
The cavity will soon be the yolk sac, delivering nutrients to the embryo
The cavity will soon be the yolk sac, delivering nutrients to the embryo

A momentous meeting has taken place inside you – a single sperm has broken through the tough outer membrane of your egg and fertilized it. Several days later, the fertilized egg arrived in the uterus and started burrowing into the lining. A baby is in the making!

Your little one is just a tiny ball (called a blastocyst), consisting of several hundred cells that are multiplying madly. The part of it that will develop into the placenta has started producing the pregnancy hormone hCG (human chorionic gonadotropin), which tells your ovaries to stop releasing eggs and triggers increased production of estrogen and progesterone. These hormones keep your uterus from shedding its lining – and its tiny passenger – and stimulate the growth of the placenta.

Meanwhile, amniotic fluid is beginning to collect around the ball of cells in the cavity that will become the amniotic sac. This fluid will cushion your baby in the weeks and months ahead.

Right now, your little blastocyst is receiving oxygen and nutrients (and discarding waste) through a primitive circulation system made up of microscopic tunnels that connect your developing baby to the blood vessels in your uterine wall. The placenta won’t be developed enough to take over this task until the end of next week.

Tips of the week

Tips on choosing a prenatal vitamin:
  • Does it contain the right vitamin and nutrient in the right doses?
  • How much do they cost?
  • Is it safe to take during pregnancy?
  • Does it contain DHA or omega acid?
  • What possible side effects it has? Does it have any digestive side effects?
Written By
More from superadmin

Swimming Lesson: Should it Be Taught Early or No?

As daunting as swimming lessons for baby sounds to you, it is...
Read More

Leave a Reply